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Engineering Design Graduate Curriculum

Engineering Design courses are aligned with three primary areas - engineering product design, systems design, and data-driven design. Engineering product design addresses the identification of consumer preferences and requirements, the evaluation of existing products and product families, and the development of innovative designs. Systems design examines the role components play within systems and the optimization of systems as a whole. This includes defining and developing a variety of systems that satisfy user requirements. Data-driven design focuses on using data to motivate and inform design decisions and assess current product performance. 

Prescribed Courses

All candidates for both the M.S. and the M.Eng. degree must take 8 credits as follows: EDSGN 581, EDSGN 582, EDSGN 585, and EDSGN 590. M.S. degree candidates must also take 6 credits of thesis - EDSGN 600/610. 

EDSGN 581: Design Studio I (3 credits) - Cross-disciplinary teams learn in a studio environment to consider broad aspects and context in their engineering design activities. 

EDSGN 582: Design Studio II (3 credits) - Cross-disciplinary teams in an engineering design studio environment with project emphasis on technical and analytical depth. Prerequisite: EDSGN 581

EDSGN 585: Design Portfolio (1 credit) - Preparation of a portfolio summarizing the student's experience with engineering design research and practice. Prerequisite or concurrent: EDSGN 582

EDSGN 590: Colloquium (1 - 3 credits) 

EDSGN 600: Thesis Research (1 - 15 credits) / EDSGN 610 Thesis Research Off Campus (1 - 15 credits)

Focus Area Elective Courses

Students choose a focus area - engineering product design, systems design, or data-driven design - within the program and take at least two courses from that area. A minimum of four courses from the focus areas must be taken. 

Engineering Product Design 

Engineering product design addresses the identification of consumer preferences and requirements, the evaluation of existing products and product families, and the development of innovation designs. 

EDSGN 497/IE 479: Human-Centered Product Design and Innovation (3 credits) - Consumer product design for a global market, incorporating human factors principles and user desires in a multicultural perspective. 

IE 546/ME 546: Designing Product Families (3 credits) - Product families, product platforms, mass customization, product variety, modularity, commonality, robust design, product architectures. 

EDSGN 547/ME 547: Designing for Human Variability (3 credits) - Statistics, optimization, and robust design methodologies to design products and environments that are roust to variability in users. 

EDSGN 548: Interaction Design (3 credits) - Strategies in user-centered design, ergonomic product analysis, statistical data analysis, low and high fidelity prototyping, and innovative design techniques. 

System design

System design focuses on defining and developing a variety of systems that satisfy user and mission requirements. 

EDSGN 401: Engineering Systems Design (3 credits) - Design requirements for complex systems; trade-offs between market opportunities and technology; translation of priorities and needs into an operational concept.

EDSGN 507/SYSEN 507: Systems Thinking (3 credits) - The theory and practice of systems thinking. General systems theory; systems dynamics, emergent properties, structure, feedback and leverage.

EDSGN 558: Systems Design (3 credits) - Systems engineering, principles and practices and the application of systems engineering in the analysis, design, development, integration, verification and validation of complex systems.

Data-driven design

Data-driven design focuses on using data to motivate and inform design decisions and assess current product performance.

EDSGN 549/IE 549: Design Decision Making (3 credits) -  Complexity of decision-making; state-of-the art methods and tools.

EDSGN 561/CSE 561/IE 561/IST 561 Data Mining–Driven Design (3 credits) - Theoretical data mining/machine learning algorithms can be employed to solve large scale, complex design problems.

Faculty Openings
 

About

The School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP) delivers effective engineering education through active, collaborative, project-based, and professionally oriented classroom experiences. SEDTAPP offers a variety of programs that partner faculty, students, and industry in the study of real-life engineering problems. Our programs teach students to solve real-life problems with innovative solutions. 

School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs

213 Hammond Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802

Phone: 814-865-2952